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 Wallace G Moore Jr

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Charlie Moore
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Charlie Moore

Number of posts : 213
Registration date : 2008-08-06

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PostSubject: Wallace G Moore Jr   Wallace G Moore Jr EmptyWed Feb 11, 2009 8:54 am

This is a thread that I hope will get some responses. The name in the subject line is my father. I put it there because of my love and respect for him. My dad died young and wasn't the world's best father. He did, however, do things in his life that deserve recognition. He is a veteran who fought in the Korean War (Conflict, if you desire). Like so many others, he did his duty in helping preserve our freedom and liberties. Alot of wars are unpopular for one reason or another. Oftentimes the troops on the battlefield don't understand their reason for being there. So, that is why I honor my father.

I'm sure everybody here has someone in their lives who deserve recognition. It may not be for military service, but for something else. It may not be public in nature, but family related. Whatever it is, it should be acknowledged. If you would prefer not to say something publicly then tell the person you admire privately how you feel and why you feel the way you do. I do this with my wife on almost a daily basis. That's always more important than roses, although they do like the roses, too.

By the way, before everyone beats me to it, I respect and honor everyone on this forum.

Charlie
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alice
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alice

Number of posts : 15672
Registration date : 2008-10-22
Age : 72
Location : Redmond, WA

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PostSubject: Re: Wallace G Moore Jr   Wallace G Moore Jr EmptyWed Feb 11, 2009 9:42 am

Charlie,

Your dad must have been good--he sired you. I respect and honor you also.

The person I wish to honor is my husband. He is a very active man who takes very good care of me.

Being a caretaker to a chronic ailer is not a man's dream come true, but he has handled the challenge very well.

He is a Viet-nam era army veteran and a retired forestor. He was with one company for 36.5 years.

He taught me how to live. We have a lot of fun traveling, taking care of our grandkids etc.
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E. Don Harpe
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E. Don Harpe

Number of posts : 1979
Registration date : 2008-01-17
Age : 78
Location : Florida

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PostSubject: Re: Wallace G Moore Jr   Wallace G Moore Jr EmptyWed Feb 11, 2009 9:56 am

Good thread Charlie, here's my contribution. In memory of your father and of my brother, and all of the men who have ever worn the uniform, and especially for those who made the ultimate sacrafice, here's my thoughts.
___________________________________________
It was a devastating day for my parents when they received word that my brother, Carlos O. Harp, had been wounded while serving in North Africa. The year was 1943, and a lot of the boys who had gone over were never to return, but the Chaplain who sent the letter to my mom was optimistic. Carlos had been wounded, he said, and had been moved to a hospital in Sicily, and seemed to be doing as well as could be expected. A week or so later, another letter came, again from the same Chaplain, which said that Carlos was better and was being sent home. My mom and dad were elated. They hated that he’d been wounded, but were so glad that he was coming back to them. Imagine the shock they got when a third letter come, from the same Chaplain, informing them that Carlos had died enroute. They simply couldn’t believe it, and in the years that followed the story became even stranger.
Carlos was one of the many boys whose body didn’t get sent home immediately. It seems there were too many of them and the transportation was too limited. So, even though he was killed in 1943, his flag draped coffin wasn’t back on the dark rich soil of Middle Tennessee until mid 1948. I recall going to the train station, where we stood and waited for the train with the bodies to pull in, and then the long black hearse that carried him from the station to Elmwood Cemetery. The body was accompanied by a color guard, and to this day I believe Taps is the saddest song one can listen to. I stood still and straight as the guard fired the twenty-one gun salute, and watched as they carefully folded the flag and presented it to my mom. As it had been so long between his death and his funeral, his casket couldn’t be opened, and that was always the saddest part of the whole thing for my mother. She never really knew, and mostly didn’t believe, that it was actually Carlos who was in the coffin.
For the rest of her life she sent letters to the army and to every one she could get an address on, asking for information about his death, and trying to learn something, anything, that might help her get a bit of closure. She never got it. Just as she never got the silver star that the army promised her, and failed to send.
I have kept this picture, along with Carlos’ Purple Heart award and the flag that draped his coffin, but never dreamed that I’d ever learn anything more than she had. I was wrong.
I posted his picture on my personal website last year, along with a poem that I dedicated to this brother that I barely knew, and somehow, someway, a person looking at the website saw the picture, and contacted me. I owe a dept of eternal gratitude to Terry Lowry, an author who also happens to be the historian of the 83 Chemical Battalion, Company C. I didn’t know that Carlos was a member of the 83rd, but after a few emails from Terry I went back through a lot of my old papers and found a “V” mail with the address on it. Sure enough, he was. I got back to Terry with the news, and he immediately sent me a message with the name and telephone number of a man in Virginia, a very astute and gracious gentleman named Hale Hepler, who was actually a bunk mate of my brothers in North Africa. I called Mister Hepler and found that he has an excellent memory, and was more than willing to tell me all that he remembered of my brother, and of the day he was shot.
Hepler and my brother had put their pup tents together so they would have a bit more sleeping room, and this is the story as he recalls it. Carlos had another friend, a soldier from Tennessee, whose last name was Hill, and they went everywhere together. One day they found a couple of old pistols in an abandoned house, and during the next week or so they loved to play quick draw with them. One or the other would shout ‘Draw,’ and both of them would pull the pistols and snap them at each other. One night Hill drew guard duty, and while he was out he thought he heard something in the bushes. When he was relieved he went back and just as he went to sleep he was called to go back out because one of the others couldn’t make it. As he’d heard something in the brush a few hours ago, he decided to load the old pistol and take it with him, just in case he may need it. The next morning Hepler and Carlos were going to breakfast when they met Hill just coming back in from guard duty. He was half asleep, and when Carlos saw him he shouted ‘Draw’ and then drew his pistol and snapped it at Hill. Hill, not remembering that he’d loaded the pistol, drew it and fired at Carlos, in the same way they had a hundred times. This time the gun was loaded and it went off and shot Carlos. Hill was later arrested, but Hepler didn’t know what happened to him. Carlos died a few days later, but Mister Hepler didn’t know that either.
I am amazed that after all this time, I have finally learned the truth, and I think somehow, somewhere, my mom and dad know it. I am grateful to Terry Lowry, and have sent him Carlos’ picture for use in the current book he is writing about the 83rd Chemical Battalion. I am grateful as well to Hale Hepler for his telling of the story, and for being a friend to my brother when they were in a strange and dangerous place. I will post links to Terry Lowry’s books and his website as soon as I can.


Visit the Carlos O. Harp Wall of Honor at

http://www.donharpe.com
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alice
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alice

Number of posts : 15672
Registration date : 2008-10-22
Age : 72
Location : Redmond, WA

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PostSubject: Re: Wallace G Moore Jr   Wallace G Moore Jr EmptyWed Feb 11, 2009 10:08 am

E. Don,

What a sad situation. Your brother's untimely demise-- most unfortunate--the army's reaction pure and unexcusable negligence. I am so sorry.
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Don Stephens
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Don Stephens

Number of posts : 1355
Registration date : 2008-01-25
Age : 81
Location : Wherever my hat's hanging today!

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PostSubject: Re: Wallace G Moore Jr   Wallace G Moore Jr EmptyWed Feb 11, 2009 10:44 am

Charlie,

I pay tribute to my Father. I did it with my short story, “My Hero, My Dad”. It is the first short story listed in the “Forever Friends” anthology.

I also pay tribute to my wife who has put up with me for forty years and loved me in spite of myself.

I also salute all who have served… http://www.djstephens.net/Memorial.html


Last edited by D. J. (Don) Stephens on Wed Feb 11, 2009 11:16 am; edited 1 time in total
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alj
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alj

Number of posts : 9633
Registration date : 2008-12-05
Age : 76
Location : San Antonio

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PostSubject: Re: Wallace G Moore Jr   Wallace G Moore Jr EmptyWed Feb 11, 2009 11:04 am

Her name was Callie Green. She was my mother's housekeeper. Alice Miller has said that it is difficult to overcome parental abuse unless you have been lucky enough to have had a "helping witness." (The untouched Key. 1990) Callie was mine. She taught me what unconditional "mother" love was all about. She had a humongous lap, and let me sit in it and cry even when I was too old to do so. She taught me that bigotry was wrong, and what the "N-word" meant to her race. When I grew up and had a daughter, she spent my first week as a new mother looking after us, and taught me to put the books away and learn to use my "mother wit." She convinced me, during that week, that it was OK to let her use the kitchen door to my house, rather than the front door, since it was closer to her car and easier on her arthritis. She could fix anything: stove burners, stopped up garbage disposals, and bathroom faucets that wouldn't turn off. All of her children went to college on the money she made keeping other people's houses. Eventually, she had a stroke, and never recovered, but when I went to visit her in the nursing home, or when one of the orderlies, who babysat my children frequently, told her about them, tears would roll down her cheeks.

Ann
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Dick Stodghill
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Dick Stodghill

Number of posts : 3795
Registration date : 2008-05-04
Age : 94
Location : Akron, Ohio

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PostSubject: Re: Wallace G Moore Jr   Wallace G Moore Jr EmptyWed Feb 11, 2009 11:31 am

Alice, you have to remember the terrific number of casualties in World War II. Just trying to keep accurate records of those wounded and killed was a near impossibility. When a company clerk would sometimes have to ask squad leaders what happened to a certain man whose name was on his roster it was very difficult to be accurate. Saying, "I think he was that blonde guy about 18 who arrived a couple of days ago," wasn't a whole lot to go on when a company might have suffered 50 per cent or more casualties that day. The Army did the best it could, which was quite a lot considering the magnitude of the job when replacements were poured into units and often were gone before anyone knew their names or could accurately describe them.
I have written about Warren Coate, a friend who was a squad leader in my division. One morning three replacements arrived for his squad. By noon all were dead. A mother of one somehow found that Warren was her son's squad leader and wrote him asking how her son died. He couldn't tell her because he didn't know which of the three he was. Even if he had known, he could only have given the stock military answer, "He died instantly." No one could or would tell the truth about such things because death on a battlefield is often unspeakable.
In that war, or any war in which mass casualties are suffered on a daily basis, the Army did the best it could.
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alice
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alice

Number of posts : 15672
Registration date : 2008-10-22
Age : 72
Location : Redmond, WA

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PostSubject: Re: Wallace G Moore Jr   Wallace G Moore Jr EmptyWed Feb 11, 2009 1:12 pm

Yes Sir
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alice
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alice

Number of posts : 15672
Registration date : 2008-10-22
Age : 72
Location : Redmond, WA

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PostSubject: Re: Wallace G Moore Jr   Wallace G Moore Jr EmptyThu Feb 12, 2009 5:56 am

By the way, Dick,

I think you must have figured it out long ago, I like and respect you also.
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Abe F. March
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Abe F. March

Number of posts : 10697
Registration date : 2008-01-26
Age : 80
Location : Germany

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PostSubject: Re: Wallace G Moore Jr   Wallace G Moore Jr EmptyThu Feb 12, 2009 7:11 am

One can like someone but not respect them. The reverse is also true. When you can both like and respect someone, that's the ultimate. Unfortunately, there are very few people I can place in that category outside of family.
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alice
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alice

Number of posts : 15672
Registration date : 2008-10-22
Age : 72
Location : Redmond, WA

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PostSubject: Re: Wallace G Moore Jr   Wallace G Moore Jr EmptyThu Feb 12, 2009 7:48 am

Lawrence Crooker

Born in 1916, the eldest of 12 children-is loved and respected by me. I don't know how he managed to do it. He lived for 12 years after a major stroke paralyzed the right side of his body.

He never complained or griped. He fell and broke a hip about 4 years ago and has been in the Nursing home ever since.

He maintained his good humor throught it all.
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Charlie Moore
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Charlie Moore

Number of posts : 213
Registration date : 2008-08-06

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PostSubject: Re: Wallace G Moore Jr   Wallace G Moore Jr EmptyThu Feb 12, 2009 11:20 am

Thanks for all the great replies. The things you've said about important people in your lives is wonderful and inspiring. My dad is important to me, but the one person who means more to me than any other, save my Lord and Savior only, passed away just recently. That is my wonderful mother, JoAnne Erma (Hansen) Moore. I could use reams of paper describing the goodness of this dear woman. Suffice it to say, mom was an incredible woman.

Charlie
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