Published Authors

A place for budding and experienced authors to share ideas about publishing and marketing books
 
HomeHome  GalleryGallery  RegisterRegister  Log in  Featured MembersFeatured Members  ArticlesArticles  

Share
 

 Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri

Go down 
AuthorMessage
Carol Troestler
Five Star Member
Five Star Member
Carol Troestler

Number of posts : 3827
Registration date : 2008-06-07
Age : 81
Location : Wisconsin

Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri EmptySat Apr 11, 2009 6:23 am

This is the first part of what my husband and I are doing on Monday night at Music in the Library in Sauk City, Wisconsin. The whole presentation will be 35 minutes long. The entire presentation is the heart of my book, and history I feel is important and is in the genre of creative nonfiction. The facts were found with in depth study. I want to try to perfect my writing in this style and genre. This is from my book but abridged and edited a few dozen more times. The songs my husband plays are interspersed amongst the words. We are passing out a program with the sequence of the songs, plus the words to a few of the more obscure Stephen Foster tunes. Sometime I'd like to do this with people to read the parts and even perhaps someone to sing the words of some of the tunes.

Music is provided by Tom Troestler, harmonica player. Sometimes he plays between my reading and sometimes during. (We've worked that all out!)

America, tune Samuel Ward, words Katharine Bates

This is the story of a family, a story of a search for freedom, and a story of our country and its attempts to form a more perfect union.
Our country has been nourished by disagreements both large and small, by those who challenged beliefs and freedoms, by those who settled this vast land through hardship and courage. Those who arrived here in the 1800s came to a country that was on the brink of a great war that would take more lives than any other our country would be involved in, was on the brink of settlement of our western land, and was on the brink of vast discoveries in technology.
Seven years ago, I moved into a new home where I unpacked the two white plates with blue flowers that came from England in 1858 with the family in this story, my ancestral family. As I held these plates, I imagined the spirits of the six women who placed them in trunks and china cabinets, who protected them through travels across the sea and land as well as war and destruction. I hope these plates will be held in the hands of my daughters and granddaughters, packed in more packing boxes, placed in more china cabinets, and the spirit of the original owner will continue as her descendants keep the plates safe.

Oh, Shenandoah, composer unknown, sea shanty or folk song

In 1858, the Farrar Boothman family took the great journey across the Atlantic Ocean from England to America, to a land of freedom, opportunity and promise. George Farrar had gone ahead of his family in 1857. At that time he was thirty-two years old. A year later, his wife Elizabeth, thirteen years older than her husband, followed him to America. She brought her five children from her first marriage to Samuel Boothman and the three children from her marriage to George Farrar. In addition, Mary Stubbs, fiancé of Elizabeth’s son, William, joined the family on this journey. This meant there were ten travelers in this group that crossed the ocean from England to Canada and on to the town of Lexington, Missouri.
Just a few years after the family’s arrival, the Civil War broke out. Missouri was split between the North and the South, not geographically, but often house to house in the same town. At the end of August 1861, this was the situation in Lexington, Missouri, a town on the south side of the Missouri River about forty miles from Kansas City. Troops loyal to the Confederacy were camped on the fair grounds in this town. By mid September, these troops would grow to over 8,000.

Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, by George Frederick Root

On August 26, 1861, Mary Stubbs Boothman gave birth to a daughter, Minnie, “on the banks of a coalmine as the family was fleeing bushwhackers.” The last is a quote from my grandmother, Minnie’s daughter. The bushwhackers were pro-slavery vigilantes. They, as well as jayhawkers, who were anti-slavery vigilantes, often made their presence known in the counties near the Kansas border.
When Stephen Crane wrote Red Badge of Courage, he said he did so because he wanted to know what the Civil War had been like. I, likewise, had many questions regarding the lives of families living on the lines of battle in the Civil War. I wanted to know how my ancestors survived in a town split between the North and the South that saw battles, jayhawkers, bushwhackers, and streams of troops from both sides
Telling this story has led me to many history books. When younger, history was something that consisted of a report to be completed or a test to pass, but recently I have delved into history with a vengeance.
I have given my ancestors personalities, thoughts, feelings, actions, and life events that have come from facts of their lives, culture of the time, as well as my imagination, inspiration, and that mysterious place where writers sometimes find themselves that feels more like reality than reality itself.

Flow Gently Sweet Afton, Robert Burns

“Blimey, don’t come one bloody step further or I’ll stop you with this shotgun in my hands!” shouted Elizabeth as she stepped outside the small shack by the coalmine to watch a lone figure coming up the bluff beside the Missouri River.
She tried to curb her passion and rage to continue in language more in keeping with her proper English heritage. “It appears your group has dwindled down to one coward. You’re all cowards, coming to homes and terrifying good women and children. Stop right there! If you come one step further I promise this gun will go off.”
“Aye, and Bessie, you’ll wake up the whole Confederate army below,” answered Elizabeth’s torch bearing husband who affectionately called her Bessie.
“Oh, George, I’m so glad you’re here,” cried Elizabeth as she ran to meet him.
“Aye, Bessie. I’m glad to have found you.”
“They came and knocked at the door and stood out front with their torches and said they were going to burn down the house if we didn’t tell them where our men were. Everyone ran out the back and fled up here. I stood on the porch and . .” Elizabeth said the last hesitantly.
“I heard that some crazy Irish woman shot holes in the roof of her porch while threatening all the time to shoot holes in the bushwhackers who had knocked at her door. I heard one of the bushwhackers said he’d rather take on the whole Union army than a crazy Irish woman with a shotgun she wasn’t afraid to use but knew nothing about. I knew it was you, my dear wife, Bessie.”
“George, I know I’m supposed to be a ‘Southern lady,’ but somehow a few words I learned from my Irish mother were all that came to mind when those men knocked at the door.”
“It’s all right, Bessie. Thanks to you and your Irish mother our home is still standing,” replied George.

Dearer Than Life, by Stephen Foster

“George, I want to show you something. Wait here.” Elizabeth went inside the mining shack and exchanged her shotgun for a bundle of a blanket. She again went outside where George was waiting. “Here is my new granddaughter, Minnie, and I guess since I am married to you, dear George, that makes you a grandfather, even if you are only thirty-six years old. Quite a young grandfather you are there.”
George held his torch close, but not too close. “Bessie, she’s beautiful! I am honored to be her grandfather, even at thirty-six.” Then he hesitated, “Mary, how’s Mary?”
“Everyone ran up here very frightened. Mary had been in labor all afternoon and we feared the effects of the flight here, but she gave birth to a healthy little girl. Now she is asleep on a cot in the mine shack. The miners got us water and blankets.” Elizabeth continued to relate the events of the evening that were to change the lives of the family forever.

Willie Has Gone to the War, by Stephen Foster

“William, where’s William?” asked George about the absent new father.
“Well, George,” Elizabeth hesitated, “he and Sir Richard have gone across the river to join the Union cavalry.”
“Sir Richard? He’s our best horse. I cannot understand why the Union requires the cavalry enlistees to bring their own horses.”
“William was quite angry and set out to avenge the birth of his daughter on the banks of a coalmine rather than in her own home. He saw little reason for the bushwhackers to come to our home and terrorize us.”
“And Alfred?”
“Well, he took Champion and . . .”
“Crossed the river to join the cavalry. I’m not surprised. He will follow his brother, William, anywhere. There’s going to be a battle here, Bessie. I had hoped we wouldn’t have to take sides, but I guess Alfred and William have chosen our side for us.”
“And the bushwhackers. Don’t forget the bushwhackers, George, standing with their torches and rifles.”
George was successful in Lexington as a brick mason, the same occupation he had in England. The homes were built from red bricks made in the area, sturdy homes that could hopefully withstand a terrible war.
“Come,” said George, serious now. “Look below.” Below the starry sky of late August were bonfires amidst tents that shown lightly in the moonlight. From below in the midst of enemy soldiers sleeping and others resting and still others talking about when and how the battle would take place, there came the strains of “Dixie” played on a lone harmonica.

Dixie, by Daniel Decatur Emmet

“George, will any of us survive? Will this baby grow up and have children and grandchildren, or will they forever be the ghost children of those lost in war?”
“Bessie, I don’t know. I don’t think we will ever know the peacefulness we have known here on the Missouri River. I feel our lives are on the brink of being changed forever.” (Harp continues to end of song.)

The harmonica ended its promise of the battle to come. Elizabeth shivered in George’s arms in spite of the heat of the evening. “George, let’s go home. It has been a long night.”
“Roger is bringing the wagon with our last two good horses up the mining road. We’ll take Mary and her baby home.” Roger was a slave who worked at the brickyard with George.
“George, what will happen to Roger? How does he feel about what is about to happen?”
“He wants to be free.”

Just As I Am, tune William Bradbury, words Charlotte Elliott
.
Lexington was a “prosperous town in the midst of the hemp-growing region, scenically and strategically situated on the south bluffs overlooking the Missouri River.” The population in1860 was 4,122, just under that of Kansas City with 4,418. A third of the people in the town were slaves. They were treated kindly. The unrest in the country had been building among these normally friendly and kind people. The divisions between the Union and Confederacy in this border state were strong.
The Union troops gathered at the Masonic College. They numbered about 2,500. Many of those on the side of the Confederacy were already at the fair grounds and many others were with General Price on his way from Warrensburg, Missouri. The townspeople knew a battle would ensue, but they did not know when and lived in tension and fear for several weeks with instances of skirmishes and small battles.
A few weeks later, September 18th, the Battle of Lexington began as one history book states, “ with a tremendous fusillade from all attacking parties. The batteries opened with the sound of a thousand storms. The beleaguered Federals replied gallantly. For three days the thunder of battle shook the foundations of the earth.”

Dixie, by Daniel Decatur Emmet

About eight o’clock in the morning on September 18th, the family heard the Confederate band marching down Main Street playing Dixie amid cheers from townspeople. Suddenly, through a confusion of wrong notes and shouting, the music ended as the battle began with a great roar of what seemed like “a million cannons at once.” Missourians later said that the battle was heard thirty miles away in Warrensburg.
And so the family huddled together. Fear shown in everyone’s eyes: fear of uncertainty, fear for William and Alfred, fear for each other, fear the next cannonball would hit their roof. One had already lodged itself in a pillar close to the courthouse roof and would remain there for the next 150 years. There were few words spoken as the noise of the battle drowned out any conversation, and no one knew what to say except words of panic that the next shot would hit all of them. The fear that filled the house was as suffocating as the smoke and dust from the battle in the streets throughout the town.
Soon the air filled with immense smoke as more homes caught on fire. Later it was said of the burning homes, “in the blackness their red embers spread ominously over the town,”

Battle Hymn of the Republic, by Julia Ward Howe

The battle lasted for three days. It seemed impossible that it could go on so long. At times there were short periods of silence with hope that it had ended, but then it started again in earnest. No one knew how either side could have enough ammunition to keep this up for so long. The reality was that the Union soldiers were producing their own ammunition at the college. When balls were fired from the other side, the soldiers made note of where they had gone, scooped them up, reloaded them and fired them back. Thus the ammunition was passed back and forth and the battle continued.
On Friday, the weather changed and the day was cold with light showers. And then in the afternoon of the third day, as suddenly as it had begun, it ended. The guns and cannons ceased.

Dixie, by Daniel Decatur Emmet

The family heard a band marching down Main Street playing Dixie to the cheers of townspeople gathered there, and they knew the Confederates had won. Roger, the slave from the brickyard came up to the house.
“George, sir, Mr. Wilson told me to come and get you and Samuel. We need to help clean up Lexington. There are dead men and horses everywhere and much help is needed,” said Roger.
George held Elizabeth and said he had to go and help. A part of him had felt guilty and cowardly for being at home when a monumental battle was occurring a few blocks away, but he questioned which side he would have been on despite his stepsons fighting for the Union. He was not in favor of slavery. Slavery had ended in England in 1830 and he had never been of sufficient wealth to be the owner of a slave anyway. He liked the negroes in the town. He knew they wanted to be free, He had voted Republican for President Lincoln, but he had also become a “southerner” in the few short years he had been there. He loved Missouri and its river.
Soon there was a knock at the door. Elizabeth’s heart skipped a beat. She knew that Alfred and William would not knock. There on the porch was William’s friend, Michael, whom Elizabeth knew had planned to fight for the Confederates. The fear of the last days returned.
“Please, ma’am, I’m neither the bearer of bad news nor here to hurt you or your family. I’m looking for Mary Boothman”
Mary stepped from behind Elizabeth.
“Follow me please, Mary. I have been instructed to take you to your husband. He is all right. Please don’t be frightened. You may bring him home.”

Abide With Me, by William Monk, words by Lyte

Mary found William in a group of other men sitting under one of the few remaining trees at the college. The college had been a beautiful building set amongst a grove of oak trees. Most of the trees were gone, and the building was only the ghost of the beautiful structure it had been.
But Mary saw only William. He looked up when she spoke his name. “Oh, Mary, I am so glad to see you. We lost the battle. We surrendered and are allowed to go home if we promise never to fight again.” A lump formed in his throat. He had meant to be a loyal soldier for the Union, fighting to the death if needed. But for now it was all right that he had surrendered after what had happened here: the great battle fought here, Lexington in ruins, Mary and his baby close by.

My Hopes Have Departed Forever, by Stephen Foster
Back to top Go down
http://www.authorsden.com/ctroestler
Brenda Hill
Five Star Member
Five Star Member
Brenda Hill

Number of posts : 1297
Registration date : 2008-02-16
Location : Southern CA

Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri EmptySat Apr 11, 2009 9:51 am

What a great program, Carol, and your husband's music will provide just the right touch. Can you videotape it and post a link? I bet most of us would love to see it.
Back to top Go down
http://www.brendahill.com
Carol Troestler
Five Star Member
Five Star Member
Carol Troestler

Number of posts : 3827
Registration date : 2008-06-07
Age : 81
Location : Wisconsin

Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri EmptySat Apr 11, 2009 11:20 am

Thank you Brenda. I don't know about videotaping it.

We did this in November of 2007 at a used bookstore the day after Thanksgiving and most of the audience were our relatives. But surprisingly one person who was there recommended our "duo presentation" for "Monday Music in the Library."

I told my husband he'd be playing some Stephen Foster songs. He thought he would know them, but the obscure ones, like "Willie Has Gone to the War" are better suited. The music helps set the mood for the presentation.

This book is dear to my heart. I love the music.

Carol
Back to top Go down
http://www.authorsden.com/ctroestler
Brenda Hill
Five Star Member
Five Star Member
Brenda Hill

Number of posts : 1297
Registration date : 2008-02-16
Location : Southern CA

Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri EmptySat Apr 11, 2009 12:11 pm

I remember watching the youtube video you made about driving in Wisconsin, so I thought you had the equipment. Hope so. I'd love to see your presentation.

I've never thought of adding music to a reading, but I think it's a wonderful idea, especially to a 'theme' reading such as yours. I can picture you reading, your husband's music, and the audience captivated.
Back to top Go down
http://www.brendahill.com
Dick Stodghill
Five Star Member
Five Star Member
Dick Stodghill

Number of posts : 3795
Registration date : 2008-05-04
Age : 94
Location : Akron, Ohio

Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri EmptySat Apr 11, 2009 3:15 pm

Sounds like a great presentation.
Back to top Go down
http://www.dickstodghill.com
Pam
Five Star Member
Five Star Member
Pam

Number of posts : 1790
Registration date : 2008-02-01
Age : 53
Location : Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri EmptySat Apr 11, 2009 7:14 pm

Carol if I was closer, I'd definitely come see you. Looks like you are going to have a great presentation, and this is a great idea. I don't think it matters if most of the appreciative audience is your family - my first readings were the same, and helped me work through the nerves a bit!
My dad had several harmonicas that he played when I was growing up, and although it's pretty rare for him to pull it out nowadays he has always had a great ear. I'll be thinking of you both! Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri 260738
Back to top Go down
http://www.mvpi.org
Carol Troestler
Five Star Member
Five Star Member
Carol Troestler

Number of posts : 3827
Registration date : 2008-06-07
Age : 81
Location : Wisconsin

Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri EmptySun Apr 12, 2009 7:48 am

Just in case anyone is interested, here is another part of the story:

My Hopes Have Departed Forever, by Stephen Foster

The next day, Samuel and George went to again help clean up the town and Lizzie and Rebecca, the oldest girls in the family, went to help with the wounded. Later that evening Lizzie and Rebecca returned. Lizzie told her mother, “He’s going to be all right, Mama.”
“Who,” asked Elizabeth. “Who’s going to be all right?”
“John, a man I am taking care of. He is better today than yesterday,” answered Lizzie.
“I’m going to keep going back there until all the soldiers are all right,” said Rebecca. This was the same young girl who had left that morning to help with the wounded with great apprehension and dread.
They heard the front door slam and Samuel came running into the kitchen. “Wait until you hear this. Mother, you know my friend Charley?”
Before Elizabeth could answer, Samuel continued excitedly. “Well, during the worst of the battle he was in his home on South Street and a Union colonel and several of his officers came inside and up to the second floor to look out at the battle. Just then a cannon ball came through the window and the colonel scooped it up with a shovel by the stove and threw the ball out the window.”
Samuel continued with the story of how the colonel showed Charley how to scoop up the cannon balls and toss them out. And then after the colonel and his men returned to the battle, Charley went on shoveling balls out the window for the rest of the battle! It was obvious Charley had become a hero to Samuel.
“He’s my age. See what I could have done. I could have been at the battle also. I told you I wasn’t too young,” he said angrily to his parents.
And so life continued. George, Samuel and Roger worked with others cleaning up the town. Lizzie and Rebecca continued nursing the wounded. The little girls seemed to going about life as little girls do as Elizabeth cared for them and their home. Alfred and William went back to their cavalry unit although they had vowed never to fight again, and little Minnie remained the symbol of the family’s hope for better things to come.

Auld Lang Syne, traditional melody, words by Robert Burns

Although hope remained, 1862 began with no promises of joy or good things. The family had a well-stocked war cellar, and most important of all they had each other. Alone no one could have made it through the war and what it could bring to one’s door any day, but together they could manage.
Since Lexington was on the trail of those going west and also on the river still active with shipping, supplies were not as scarce as in other parts of Missouri.
One of the activities of those at home, as well as those in the service, was to write letters. Following are some of the letters that could have been written in 1862.

I Will Be True to Thee, by Stephen Foster

March 15, 1862
Dear William,
You will never guess what has happened! I am in love. Oh, so in love and I only just met the object of my affection a few weeks ago. But I think as soon as we laid eyes on each other we felt the pangs of true love. His name is Bartlett and he is with the 23rd Infantry, which is now camped in town. I feel so safe now that he and his company are here! He is a sergeant, a very important soldier. I can’t wait for you to meet him. I think you will like him. He will be here in Lexington for the next few months and is even billeted in our home with several other soldiers. Mother has let them sleep in Alfred’s room so that they can have a good night’s sleep, which as you are familiar with, is difficult in a tent in the winter.
Oh, I’m sorry, William. I hope I didn’t make you feel bad thinking of someone sleeping in a warm bed with blankets and pillows when you have to sleep in a tent at the present time.
I hope you can come home soon. Perhaps it would be safe for you to do so now that the Union soldiers are here in town for the next few months. I haven’t even heard of Quantrill or General Price coming here since the U.S. 23rd Infantry has been here protecting us.
Oh, William, help this war be over soon.
Love,
Your Sister, Rebecca

I Will Be True to Thee, by Stephen Foster

April 5, 1862
Dearest William,
I miss you so much. Come home very soon, dearest husband. I want to be in your arms again. Sometimes I don’t know how I can survive another day or night without you.
Minnie is growing every day. She is the most beautiful baby in the world!
What do you think about going to Chicago after the war? I’d love to live there. I don’t think the people here will ever get along after being enemies. You can’t imagine how difficult it is when the neighbors think we are fighting on the wrong side and they are against us. I liked the city of Chicago when we went through it on our way from England. What do you think about this idea?
Return soon, my love.
Your loving wife, Mary

The Girl I Left Behind, Irish ballad folk tune

April 15, 1862
My beloved Mary,
How I miss you, holding you, having you close beside me when I go to sleep at night. Every night I go to sleep with thoughts of you.
I truly love Lexington, Mary. I believe that the people will be able to come together in peace. They are all good people. The losses have been great on both sides and I wish for peace soon. We will all be part of the same country again which is what I am fighting for. However, I know these times have been hard for you and perhaps we could go to Chicago for a short time to see what it is like.
Thank you for the knitted socks. They are much needed.
Love forever,
William

The Girl I Left Behind, Irish ballad folk tune

April 21, 1862
Dear William,
My dear son, I hope you are well. We think of you every day. You have a beautiful daughter and we are all taking good care of her and Mary. I hope this war is over soon before the losses are any greater. We try to find out as much as possible and welcome any information you may have. Samuel is very good at getting information for us. You know how curious he is and always wants to know what is going on. But sometimes it can be very confusing. Some days there are Confederates in town and other days the Union troops come through.
We hear that the Confederate government has recognized Missouri as a Confederate State. But others say that Missouri is still part of the Union. I so hope the latter is the truth. Some say we now have two governments with representation in both the Union and Confederate congress. This is all very confusing and not the peacefulness I had hoped for here in America.
But perhaps from all this, Lily and Roger and their people will gain their freedom. I don’t believe it is ever right for one man to own another man, woman, or child. We all need to be free, to pursue our dreams, to follow our life paths. I try to be a “southern lady” and love the southern ways of life, but slavery is one I cannot accept.
Please, take care of yourself, my dear son. I pray for you every day and every night. You are constantly in my thoughts.
I miss being in our church since it has been closed for the duration of the war, out of fear that people will assemble and cause more trouble, as if we don’t already have trouble. But I am learning I can have prayers in my heart and hymns on my lips all hours of the day. Many of those prayers are for you.
Love always,
Mother

Aura Lee, by W. W. Fosdick

May 17, 1862
Dear Alfred,

How are you? Did you get the socks I knitted for you? I worry about you, dear brother.
I have not heard from John for a while. His wound healed well and he said he would send for me to come to Chicago, but his promises have not held true. I feel so sad and disappointed and generally distressed. I love him so.
Time is passing me by, Alfred. I am in my late twenties and have no husband or children, as I would have expected to have by now. All the men have gone to fight, and although Rebecca has found a love in the latest regiment to come through town, I don’t think I will ever be able to love anyone as I have John. Please don’t tell anyone else these things. I am so unhappy. I see little Minnie and so wish I had a baby like her. If this war is not over soon I will be too old to marry.
I hope you are well. Please stay safe. I miss you.
Love,
Your sister, Lizzie

We’re Coming Father Abraham, by Stephen Foster

May 17, 1862
Dear William,
Get this war over! I don’t like it. Every day I hear shots. I am afraid to go outside.
Minnie is so much fun. She can smile and laugh. I hope you like the picture I have drawn of her.
Love,
Your little sister Carrie

Soldier’s Joy, traditional

June 1, 1862
Dear William and Alfred,
How I wish I could fight along side of you. I know I would be a good soldier and would fight hard for the Federal cause. But I have to stay here at home like some young boy, laying bricks and helping Father when I need to be doing bigger and more important things like fighting the Confederates and bushwhackers.
Sometimes I want to run away and join up, but we have a house full of women here who need to be protected if the bushwhackers return. I have taken it upon myself to be the one who listens and watches for them. Then I can act as a “young boy” and no one pays attention to my listening and watchfulness and I can gather information to help protect my family.
So, alas, I stay here, doing mundane work while you are doing that which is most important and honorable at this time in this nation.
But if this war lasts past my eighteenth birthday, I will sign up and join in the fighting to the last no matter what. But do you think it could last that long? I really hope not.
Your brother,
Samuel

Ah, May the Red Rose Live Always, by Stephen Foster

June 17, 1862
Dear John,
I have not heard from you for several months. This is the last time I will write, as I fear you have found someone else and are afraid to tell me, although that would be all right. I understand we are in a war and times are difficult, and even in normal times people fall in love in circumstances they do not expect. Sometimes love must go unrequited for many reasons.
I just want you to know that I will always love you. I wish you joy in your life. I will always remember the time I spent with you.
Love forever and always,
Lizzie

Ah, May theRed Rose Live Always, by Stephen Foster

On May 4th 1863 an order was given ordering all men who were not friendly toward the U.S. government out of Lexington. George was allowed to continue with his business at the brickyard because of the fact his stepsons were fighting for the Union. Others closed up their shops and left, neither wanting to deal with trouble nor vow loyalty to the Union. Some left who were just tired of the unrest.
From July 9, 1863, to August 31, 1863, William was sick in a Union hospital at Bloomfield, Missouri and later taken to St. Louis. Conditions at these hospitals were atrocious as there were few doctors and treatment was haphazard and unpredictable. There was little equipment, supplies, or knowledge for treating the illnesses and wounds of the war.
In August 1863, the bushwhackers burned Lawrence, Kansas, in retaliation for the deaths of some of their women relatives who had been imprisoned there. After the burning, the raiders shot the men of the town leaving widows and orphans without homes, fathers and husbands, or possessions.
Because of this incident, General Ewing of the Union Army issued Order 11, evacuating all residents living in counties just west of Lexington and on the border with Kansas. Residents were given fifteen days to leave their homes. The road to Lexington became crowded with women and children, some with few clothes on and most barefoot. Their fathers and husbands had gone to fight in the war leaving the women behind who now had to leave their homes and get their children and themselves to safety.
The war had already lasted longer than anyone had expected and the end seemed nowhere in sight.

In The Garden, by Charles Austin Miles

The year 1864 arrived as those in Lexington and elsewhere were tired of the war, sometimes feeling it would never end. Supplies became scarcer and even Elizabeth was unable to find goods the family needed.
In February 1864, William’s unit was transferred to duty at a prison at Rock Island, Illinois, on an island in the Mississippi River, accessible by a wooden bridge from Davenport, Iowa. Between December and April, thirty Union guards and 900 Confederate prisoners died from smallpox. Some called the prison at Rock Island the Andersonville of the North because of brutality there. Some Union guards would shoot haphazardly at the prisoners at night, as they would venture outside to relieve themselves in the trench provided. The guards were men like William, those who were no longer healthy enough to fight, but not ill enough to be discharged. Their conditions were not much better than the prisoners. They were tired and sick and had lost their sense of purpose and sometimes their sense of right and decency.
And one night, after several fellow Union soldiers had died and others viciously shot at sick prisoners, William decided decided it was enough. He had shot enough people, watched enough people on both sides die, been sick in enough hospitals where one became more ill than well.
So on March 20th, in the middle of the night, he told the sentry at the gate he was going for a walk and crossed the bridge to Davenport for the last time. The next morning, he did not report for duty.
The Farrars and Boothmans went on as best they could. They wrote more letters, knitted more socks, drank more tea, provided diversions whenever possible. But Elizabeth and George were becoming weary. Hope was dwindling, as a war expected to be over quickly continued with consequences that far surpassed anyone’s expectations. They waited months for word of William, as numbness had replaced anxiety.

Michael Row the Boat Ashore, African American spiritual

William finally came to the Missouri River in September, after months of intermittent illness, walking in the rain of the Iowa spring, and then the heat of the Iowa summer, and on south into Missouri. He crossed the river on the ferry in a tattered uniform, now barely recognizable, and walked the last few blocks to home and a family who would nurse him back to health.

Hard Times Come Again No More, by Stephen Foster

And then in 1865, the war ended. The Missouri government freed the slaves three weeks before the Federal government did. The churches were reopened. The Boothmans and Farrars had survived although more than 27,000 Missourians had died during the four years of the war.
It was as if no one in the family could take any more changes than what were forced upon them. It sometimes seemed as if time had stopped. No one in the family died, no one got married, no new babies were born after Minnie.
The war ended quietly. At the end of the war it was as if a clock was slowly winding down, and then it stopped. The state was in ruins and there were those ready and willing to put it together again, physically and emotionally. William was one of them. He was glad to be home in Missouri.
Back to top Go down
http://www.authorsden.com/ctroestler
Carol Troestler
Five Star Member
Five Star Member
Carol Troestler

Number of posts : 3827
Registration date : 2008-06-07
Age : 81
Location : Wisconsin

Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri EmptySun Apr 12, 2009 7:49 am

And the ending:

Hard Times Come Again No More, by Stephen Foster

There were many changes following the war. The state needed rebuilding: its buildings, families, and people’s hearts. It would take time. It would take work. The negroes were given jobs and treated kindly as they always had been, but now as free people.
The beautiful brick homes continued to rise in Lexington with the help of William, Alfred, Samuel, George and others, and life became culturally rich in this town as these people pursued justice, domestic tranquility and the general welfare through schools, churches and new homes.
Those in the Boothman Farrar family got married and had children, Rebecca to her soldier who had been billeted in their home and later even Lizzie who married a widower when she was thirty-eight. He had two children and this couple had two more.
William and Mary Boothman had ten more children after the war giving Minnie many brothers and sisters. They included Willie, Betty, George, Mae, Florence, Alice, Frank, Alfred, Charles and Martha. George, Mae and Alfred did not live past childhood. I knew Martha and Florence. My mother knew the rest except Alice, whom she was named after. Every few months, I speak with Flo, Florence’s granddaughter, and Martha, Martha’s granddaughter. These people were part of my extended family as a child, working at jobs, laughing, hugging each other, making memories, but it is only later that I have learned the history we all carry with us.

Precious Memories, traditional Gospel hymn
Back to top Go down
http://www.authorsden.com/ctroestler
Abe F. March
Five Star Member
Five Star Member
Abe F. March

Number of posts : 10720
Registration date : 2008-01-26
Age : 80
Location : Germany

Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri EmptySun Apr 12, 2009 12:31 pm

Sounds like it will an event to remember.
Your books on history that involves family members makes it extra special.
Back to top Go down
Malcolm
Five Star Member
Five Star Member
Malcolm

Number of posts : 1504
Registration date : 2008-01-11
Location : Georgia

Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri EmptySun Apr 12, 2009 1:52 pm

Really nice, Carol.

Malcolm
Back to top Go down
http://www.conjurewomanscat.com
Carol Troestler
Five Star Member
Five Star Member
Carol Troestler

Number of posts : 3827
Registration date : 2008-06-07
Age : 81
Location : Wisconsin

Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri EmptySun Apr 12, 2009 1:55 pm

Thanks everyone.

Carol
Back to top Go down
http://www.authorsden.com/ctroestler
zadaconnaway
Five Star Member
Five Star Member
zadaconnaway

Number of posts : 4017
Registration date : 2008-01-16
Age : 71
Location : Washington, USA

Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri EmptyMon Apr 13, 2009 12:00 am

This is a terrific endeavor, and with your husband doing music, it should be perfect. Break a leg!
Back to top Go down
http://www.zadaconnaway.com
alj
Five Star Member
Five Star Member
alj

Number of posts : 9633
Registration date : 2008-12-05
Age : 76
Location : San Antonio

Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri EmptyMon Apr 13, 2009 5:30 am

Beautiful, Carol. You are so fortunate to have such support from Tom for your excellent work.

Ann
Back to top Go down
http://www.annjoiner.com
Carol Troestler
Five Star Member
Five Star Member
Carol Troestler

Number of posts : 3827
Registration date : 2008-06-07
Age : 81
Location : Wisconsin

Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri EmptyMon Apr 13, 2009 6:52 am

Ann,

I wouldn't be doing this without him. When I couldn't walk I would have had to go in a nursing home if he weren't here, and when I felt like giving up, he wouldn't let me.

It is kind of a celebration of being well.

Carol heart
Back to top Go down
http://www.authorsden.com/ctroestler
Carol Troestler
Five Star Member
Five Star Member
Carol Troestler

Number of posts : 3827
Registration date : 2008-06-07
Age : 81
Location : Wisconsin

Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri EmptyMon Apr 13, 2009 1:41 pm

I just received an invitation to do our presentation at the town's Civil War reenactment in June.

One just never knows what might come their way regarding his or her books.

Carol
Back to top Go down
http://www.authorsden.com/ctroestler
zadaconnaway
Five Star Member
Five Star Member
zadaconnaway

Number of posts : 4017
Registration date : 2008-01-16
Age : 71
Location : Washington, USA

Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri EmptyMon Apr 13, 2009 2:08 pm

That is truly wonderful Carol! Very Happy Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri 401565 Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri 986243 Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri 986286 I just know you are going to shine! Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri 846271 Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri 46482 Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri 931984 sunny
Back to top Go down
http://www.zadaconnaway.com
Carol Troestler
Five Star Member
Five Star Member
Carol Troestler

Number of posts : 3827
Registration date : 2008-06-07
Age : 81
Location : Wisconsin

Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri EmptyMon Apr 13, 2009 6:40 pm

We are home. It went well. There were about 15 people there. I put some pictures of my husband and I and my display in my gallery.

I sold two books. One to the library. The librarian said my book is always checked out and they needed another.

Some of the people who attended had already read the book.

They liked my book of pictures of family and the town where the book took place. (I could put these pictures in a book trailer!)

People really liked my outfit and hat.

Carol
Back to top Go down
http://www.authorsden.com/ctroestler
Sponsored content




Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty
PostSubject: Re: Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri   Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri Empty

Back to top Go down
 
Reading from Flow On Sweet Missouri
Back to top 
Page 1 of 1

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Published Authors :: Marketing :: Events-
Jump to: